The itsy, bitsy baby climbed out of the high chair

I saw this story in the Columbus Dispatch today noting an increase in the number of injuries to babies caused by high chairs.  On average, 9,400 kids are hurt every year due to high chairs – a number that has been on the rise.

Baby in highchair

To be sure, some injuries were caused by children climbing out, while other are related to defects in the chair itself.

What does this mean to you:

Always register your baby products with the manufacturer so you are kept abreast of recalls.  Or, you can sign up to receive alerts from the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

 

Pool pointers

Although you wouldn’t know from the weather this weekend, summer is actually upon us.  That means every red-blooded American child is itching to get to the pool.  As fun and relaxing as pools can be, keep in mind they can be quite dangerous, especially for kids.

kids at pool

Approximately 3,500 people in the US die every year from drowning and 20% of those are kids under age 14.

What does this mean to you:

Keep a couple of basic safety rules in mind when kids are around pools.  Never leave kids alone, even for a second.  Be careful around covered pools, pool drains, and pipes.  And teach kids to swim before taking them to the pool to increase their skills and comfort level around open water.

The dangers of drop-sides

Drop-side cribs have been outlawed in the US since June 2011.  Infants’ heads can become trapped in the gaps around the drop-side.  While no new drop-side cribs are being made, plenty are still in use around the country.

13151a-2

A recall was issued this week for drop-side cribs made by PT Domusindo Perdana.  The cribs were sold at JC Penney from January 1998 through December 2008.  The drop-side can detach or fall off, causing a fall hazard.

What does this mean to you:

You can learn more about the recall here.  If you have one of these cribs, or any drop-side crib, contact the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Naughty nanny

Nannies are supposed to be stern caregivers, often with obnoxious nasal accents, who, at a minimum, keep children alive.  The Nap Nanny, on the other hand, is a molded foam bed that is supposed to help babies sleep.  Unfortunately, it has also been linked to at least 5 deaths, among other incidents, where babies are found hanging over the side.  The Consumer Product Safety Commission announced a recall of the Nap Nanny today, made by Baby Matters, for these reasons.  The recall affects over 150,000 Nap Nannies already sold.

piggy back ride

What does this mean to you:

Check to see if the unit is part of the recall and contact the store where it was purchased, or call to find out more.

Tis the season

I saw this list recently – the top 10 most dangerous toys of all time.  Some of the toys on the list are downright jaw-droppingly dangerous and would make Irving Mainway proud.  Take, for example, the CSI fingerprint kit made with asbestos dust, made as recently as 2007(!)  Others, like the Hannah Montana card game laced with lead, are not as obvious.

child gun

What does this mean to you:

Always fill out and return the warranty cards that come with children’s products so you know when a recall happens and you can be up to date with the most current information.

 

Add one more to the list

When we think of things that are dangerous to children, generally things like strollers or cribs come to mind.  But products designed for adults pose a dangers to little ones as well.  I stumbled on this tragic story about unstable furniture, like dressers, cabinets, and chests, that can tip over and pin children down, often with disastrous consequences.

Child climbing a dresser

What does this mean to you:

As parents, we can’t assume that only “kids products” pose dangers to kids.  To anticipate what children might get into, we have to to think like they would and approach common situations as they would.  Come to think of it, that might not be a bad way to approach life anyway for purposes of our health, business success, and mental acuity.

Not a leisurely stroll

Longtime readers of FSBD know I’ve covered the issue of dangerous children’s products before on this blog.  I saw this article today that Peg Perego stollers have just been recalled, with at least one death reported.  This, in the wake of other recent stroller recalls by both Graco and Maclaren.

Weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

What this means to you:

Though we may not want to do it for every DVD player or blender we buy, take 30 seconds and fill out the warranty card so you are apprised of recalls as soon as they happen, especially for products that impact the safety of children.

It’s all about the children

One of my favorite SNL sketches from back in the day was Dan Aykroyd as Irwin Mainway on the show “Consumer Probe.”  Mr. Mainway made toys for kids such as Johnny Switchblade, Bag O’ Glass (part of the very successful Bag O’ line), and Teddy Chainsaw Bear.  Classic!  The comedy lies in the fact that the danger in these kids products is patently obvious to everyone.

Is he playing with Mr. Skingrafter?

But plenty of products for children are recalled for hidden problems and latent defects each year.  Everything from strollers to cribs to toys with magnets in them.  Time Magazine just did a story on these issues.

What does this mean to you:

Though it is a pain, always fill out and return the warranty cards that come with products – especially children’s products – so you know when a recall happens.  A recall can be critical evidence in proving a claim.  Without a recall notice, you are relying on the goodness of Mr. Mainway’s heart to give you notice.