Sooner or later, they’re going to get one right

When I was growing up, Dad always had workshop.  One of the mantra’s I heard him repeat (and find myself repeating to my kids) is “measure twice, cut once.”  That is, make sure the part fits before you make it permanent.  The parents of the good people of Zimmer apparently never imparted such wisdom to their kids.

41Z6K8E2MNL._SX300_

Zimmer has now had to recall a part of its Persona artificial knee implant, specifically, the Persona porous coated, uncemented trabecular metal tibial plate.  Say that three times fast.  It seems that Zimmer began selling its knee implant without doing any clinical trials first.  This is the same problem Stryker had with its hip implants recently.

Zimmer Persona knee components can become loose, causing swelling and pain, and develop radiolucent lines – large gaps between the parts of the implant and the bones – which can damage both the bones (called osteolysis) and the device itself.

What does this mean to you:

A couple of rhetorical questions come to mind.  Shouldn’t companies that make products, especially ones that get implanted inside your body, have to test them first?  And how does one actually recall a device AFTER its been implanted?

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That fracking hurts!

Ohio has become the new Texas with the oil and gas drilling boom consuming much of eastern Ohio.  Most of the media attention around fracking has focused on the environmental impacts – flammable tap water, earthquakes in Ohio, or toxic drinking water, to name a few.  Nasty stuff, to be sure.

fracking

But the physical dangers to people in the area of the wells, workers and others, is also a big fracking problem.  I saw this article today about a worker at a well in Noble County, Ohio who died after an explosion.  I suspect we will start to see more and more unfortunate, but preventable, injuries in the fracking industry in the coming months and years.

What does this mean to you:

Though the energy companies promise jobs and increased economic opportunities to the communities they invade, the costs – in terms of both environmental and human loss – continue to mount.

Shhh! We’d like to keep our fraud secret!

So, Über and Lyft want to keep their insurance policies secret, which raises a lot of questions in my mind.  Like, what are they hiding?  And specifically, what is covered by the policy?  Is it only the driver, or are the passengers covered too?  Seems like we should be allowed to know the answers.

secret

 

Interestingly, the companies are required to carry uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage – insurance that protects you when you are not at fault.  But, there is no requirement that the rest of us buy uninsured motorists coverage, and there is no requirement that your agent offer or even explain it to you.   Its important enough to require it for those services, but not for everyone else.  Hmmm.

What does this mean to you:

Go now and find out how much uninsured motorists coverage you carry on your insurance policy.  We will wait for you here.  Yes, its that important.  Go on.

Do you have uninsured motorists coverage in your auto policy?  Do you also have it in your umbrella policy?  What are the limits?  Considering that almost 15% of drivers carry no insurance and many more do not carry enough insurance, do you have high enough limits?

 

What did you expect?

Its football season again.  Finally.  But with the season comes the ongoing discussion about concussions, especially repeated ones, and what is and is not an acceptable level of carnage that players endure for our amusement.  The NFL recently settled a lawsuit by former players regarding concussions.  And now comes word that a suit has been filed in California against FIFA attempting to alter rules to curb concussions too.

Brain Trauma

What does this mean to you:

Does everyone know that slamming your head into a 300 lb. hunk of linebacker is probably not good?  Sure.  But if the organizing league had information that the problem is much worse than reported, and refused to take action to fix the problem, all in order to make a profit at expense of the players’ health, that is a problem too.

That is NOT normal

I am not sure if this video is a critique of engineering standards, politicians, or just Australians.  Nonetheless, it seems to illustrate the often odd, and sometimes belligerent, lengths some will go to in order to deflect personal responsibility away from themselves.

The front fell off.

What does this mean to you:

As wacky as this video seems, corporate decision-makers and insurance adjusters often don’t like to admit reality when there is money at stake.  That’s why a lawyer’s ability to take depositions of these folks in litigation and put them under oath is a powerful tool.

Add one more to the list

When we think of things that are dangerous to children, generally things like strollers or cribs come to mind.  But products designed for adults pose a dangers to little ones as well.  I stumbled on this tragic story about unstable furniture, like dressers, cabinets, and chests, that can tip over and pin children down, often with disastrous consequences.

Child climbing a dresser

What does this mean to you:

As parents, we can’t assume that only “kids products” pose dangers to kids.  To anticipate what children might get into, we have to to think like they would and approach common situations as they would.  Come to think of it, that might not be a bad way to approach life anyway for purposes of our health, business success, and mental acuity.

Not a leisurely stroll

Longtime readers of FSBD know I’ve covered the issue of dangerous children’s products before on this blog.  I saw this article today that Peg Perego stollers have just been recalled, with at least one death reported.  This, in the wake of other recent stroller recalls by both Graco and Maclaren.

Weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

What this means to you:

Though we may not want to do it for every DVD player or blender we buy, take 30 seconds and fill out the warranty card so you are apprised of recalls as soon as they happen, especially for products that impact the safety of children.

A better mousetrap

Whenever time allows, I try to get into the workshop for some quality time woodworking.

This is a stand-up desk I built. I now use it in my office at work.

Half the fun or working on projects are the tools you get to use.  But to say that these tools can be dangerous is an understatement, and few tools are more dangerous than the table saw.  Every year, more than 3,500 people lose a finger on a traditional table saw.

This saw does not have SawStop, much less a guard.

But there is a technology that can prevent virtually all finger amputations from table saws.  Its called SawStop.  It works by sensing the electrical  current in a finger and immediately stops the blade from spinning.  However, none of the major manufacturers of table saws have incorporated this technology into their saws.  The companies, through their trade group – The Power Tool Institute, are even fighting making this technology mandatory for all table saws.

What does this mean to you:

Does everyone know that table saws are dangerous?  Sure.  But does everyone know that the manufacturers could make their table saws safer and avoid the horror of amputations, but have chosen not to?  Methinks not. Even when a product does not malfunction, it may still be defective based on the design choices made by the manufacturer.

On the road again…

Road rage, aggressive driving, asleep at the wheel.  These traits are bad enough when it’s the driver of another car doing it.  When it is the driver of a massive semi, its even worse.

Git 'er done.

Even though the safety benefits of trucks slowing down are well-know, crashes with semi’s continue to account for more that 4,000 fatalities per year.  That’s 10 people every day for a year.  Every year.  As a result, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has begun cracking down on dangerous trucking companies.

What does it mean to you:

What may seem like mere rude behavior can have an huge impact when a case it brought by a lawyer.  The behavior of a truck driver or trucking company can often dramatically affect the value of personal injury or wrongful death claim, positively or negatively.