100% natural cancer

“Natural” foods and products seem to be all the rage these days.  Buzzwords like “organic,” “free range,” and “gluten free” convey a sense of health and superiority to other products.  But not all natural products are good for you.

Talcum powder on black background

This is not the powder you’re looking for.

Talc in talcum powder is a naturally-occurring mineral, similar in composition to asbestos. Research suggests, however, that talc may be linked to ovarian cancer.  Two recent cases against Johnson & Johnson in St. Louis found that they knew about the risk of ovarian cancer and never disclosed it.

What does this mean to you:

Interestingly, talcum powder is not regulated by the FDA, as other products are, but the makers should still warn about its potential dangers.  I guess talc is not considered a drug.  Or, you know, a food.  What I’m saying is, don’t eat talcum powder.

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Testing, schmesting.

You would think that medical devices  implanted inside your body would be some of the most highly-tested products in the world.  Not so, though, for hip implants made by the Stryker company, who began selling its hips without going through clinical trials first.

science experiment

Stryker claimed its hips were similar to DePuy’s metal on metal hips that were already for sale.  The fault in this logic, if you can call it that, is that DePuy’s hip implants are the ones having problems with fretting and corrosion of the metal, which causes pain and swelling.  This defect may even lead to metalosis – metal toxicity in the blood stream caused by metal ions and shavings from the implant itself.  This, despite the fact that the industry has known for some time that as much as 40% of metal-on-metal hip implants would fail.

Stryker has since recalled its Rejuvenate and ABG II hip implants.  DePuy has since settled many of the claims against it for $2.5 billion.

What does this mean to you:

Someone with a recalled hip implant probably does not know the make or model they have.  If an implant patient continues to have, or suddenly develops, pain or swelling around their hip implant, they should check with their surgeon right away.

You caught us red – hipped

There are really only 2 reasons a company ever does anything.  The first, and most pervasive reason, is to make money.  The second is when it forced, kicking and screaming, to take responsibility through the justice system for its own products or conduct.

money in trap

The latter was the case this week when Johnson & Johnson agreed to pay $2.5 billion to settle claims related to its defective metal-on-metal hip implants. The company had known for some time that their devices would fail, but forgot to mention it to anyone.  Oops.

What does this mean to you.

It is not too late to make a claim if you had a hip implant made by Johnson & Johnson or DePuy.

Thanks for nothing

Medical devices are supposed to solve our medical ailments, not cause them.  What am I missing here?

However, the FDA announced last summer that it was concerned about problems caused by surgical mesh – a medical device implanted, usually in women, to repair a hernia or pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Problems can involve bleeding, infection, pain, and urinary problems.  Then, earlier this year, the FDA ordered makers of surgical mesh to more closely study the risks involved with their products.  As of today, Johnson & Johnson, one of several manufacturers, has stated it will no longer sell surgical mesh products.  (Recall that this is the same Johnson & Johnson who also made the now-recalled DePuy ASR hip implants.)

What does this mean to you:

Though surgical mesh has not been recalled, it has caused enough issues to raise serious concerns.  Keep in mind that complications following a surgery are not always “normal,” and may actually be related to a medical device with known problems.