In addition, Marlboro will sponsor the Komen 5k race

Mark Twain once said that golf is a good walk spoiled.  Truth be told, I  tend to agree with him.  But people nonetheless seem to enjoy the activity, whether they’re out strolling the fairway or going for the long ball.

hip

Hopefully, then, the irony was not lost this week when it was announced that the PGA Tour would be sponsored by – wait for it – Stryker Orthopedics.  Yes, that Stryker Orthopedics.  The one that made 20,000 defective ABG II and Rejuvenate metal hip implants.  The ones that would be bad for golfers (or anyone else who likes to, you know, move) to use.

What does this mean to you:

Remember that advertising and corporate sponsorship can be as much about framing and creating a positive public image as about selling products.

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You caught us red – hipped

There are really only 2 reasons a company ever does anything.  The first, and most pervasive reason, is to make money.  The second is when it forced, kicking and screaming, to take responsibility through the justice system for its own products or conduct.

money in trap

The latter was the case this week when Johnson & Johnson agreed to pay $2.5 billion to settle claims related to its defective metal-on-metal hip implants. The company had known for some time that their devices would fail, but forgot to mention it to anyone.  Oops.

What does this mean to you.

It is not too late to make a claim if you had a hip implant made by Johnson & Johnson or DePuy.

You mean they didn’t do that already?

Hip joints are important.  Not just to be seen at on the weekends with all the cool kids, but more importantly, to help in walking and stability.  (See what I did there?)

Artificial hip maker Johnson & Johnson knew 40% of its hip implants would fail within in five years.  These are hip joints where metal contacts with metal, causing pain and metal ions to be shaved off into the blood stream.  Even though it knew this, the corporation continued to sell the defective hips to consumers.

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Under a new proposal, makers of artificial hips would now have to prove they were safe BEFORE they could selling existing hips or obtain approval for new all-metal designs.  Darn regulations!

What does this mean to you:

Insurance companies and corporations like Johnson & Johnson hide evidence and information that makes them look bad.  (Read: causes them to actually be accountable for the injuries they cause.)  Talk to a lawyer before ever attempting to communicate or negotiate with one of these companies.

 

We don’t know what we – I mean, you – are talking about

Baby Boomers appear to be here to stay.  I mean, they even have their own Association now, so you know they’re going to stick around and ask for stuff.  Stuff like hip implants that don’t fail after being implanted, causing pain, swelling, and metal on metal friction to throw off chromium and cobalt ions in to their blood streams.  Some people!  For what it’s worth, the medical research surrounding metal ions is ongoing, but as far as I know, no doctors have started prescribing chromium and cobalt ions to be taken once daily by mouth along with your Flintstones.

Doh!

But, the maker of many hip implants, a company called DePuy (pronounced “Dapew”) who is owned by Johnson & Johnson, knew for quite a while that its ASR hip implants were failing.  It was recently learned that, rather than tell the FDA of the product’s defects, or make a change to its design, or immediately recall the device, DePuy opted merely to not make any more ASR hips, but continue to sell the problematic hips it had remaining.

What does this meant to you:

Many times, patients may not know the brand or model of the particular implant they have.  That is, a person may have a DePuy ASR and not even know it.  If you’re having problems, its important to check with your doctor to see which type you have, and if need be, discuss it with a lawyer.